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Author Topic: The Astronomy Thread  (Read 7338 times)

Offline LaJon

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Offline Stryfe

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2009, 02:39:06 PM »
« Last Edit: November 25, 2009, 02:43:18 PM by Stryfe »

Offline Stryfe

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #22 on: December 19, 2009, 03:12:36 PM »


Feel tiny yet?

Offline daigong

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #23 on: December 31, 2009, 06:35:04 AM »
GET READY!!!! Look up at the Skies!

Once in a blue moon event to ring in 2010; next New Year's Eve blue moon will be 2028



Tue Dec 29, 3:50 PM

By Alicia Chang, The Associated Press
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LOS ANGELES - Once in a blue moon there is one on New Year's Eve.

Revelers ringing in 2010 will be treated to a so-called blue moon. According to popular definition, a blue moon is the second full moon in a month. But don't expect it to be blue - the name has nothing to do with the colour of our closest celestial neighbour.

The New Year's Eve blue moon will be visible in the United States, Canada, Europe, South America and Africa. For partygoers in Australia and Asia, the full moon does not show up until New Year's Day, making January a blue moon month for them.

However, the Eastern Hemisphere can celebrate with a partial lunar eclipse on New Year's Eve when part of the moon enters the Earth's shadow. The eclipse will not be visible in the Americas.

A full moon occurred on Dec. 2. It will appear again on Thursday in time for the New Year's countdown.

"If you're in Times Square, you'll see the full moon right above you. It's going to be that brilliant," said Jack Horkheimer, director emeritus of the Miami Space Transit Planetarium and host of a weekly astronomy TV show.

A full moon occurs every 29.5 days, and most years have 12. On average, an extra full moon in a month - a blue moon - occurs every 2.5 years. The last time there was a lunar double take was in May 2007. New Year's Eve blue moons are rarer, occurring every 19 years. The last time was in 1990; the next one won't come again until 2028.

Blue moons have no astronomical significance, said Greg Laughlin, an astronomer at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

"'Blue moon' is just a name in the same sense as a 'hunter's moon' or a 'harvest moon,"' Laughlin said in an email.

The popular definition of blue moon came about after a writer for Sky&Telescope magazine in 1946 misinterpreted the Maine Farmer's Almanac and labeled a blue moon as the second full moon in a month. In fact, the almanac defined a blue moon as the third full moon in a season with four full moons, not the usual three.

Though Sky&Telescope corrected the error decades later, the definition caught on. For purists, however, this New Year's Eve full moon doesn't even qualify as a blue moon. It's just the first full moon of the winter season.

In a tongue-in-cheek essay posted on the magazine's Web site this week, senior contributing editor Kelly Beatty wrote: "If skies are clear when I'm out celebrating, I'll take a peek at that brilliant orb as it rises over the Boston skyline to see if it's an icy shade of blue. Or maybe I'll just howl."

-

On the Net:

http://www.miamisci.org/www/eventsplan.html

Offline Stryfe

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #24 on: January 14, 2010, 05:32:48 PM »

Offline Stryfe

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2010, 01:34:34 PM »



Offline atomic_particle

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #26 on: March 07, 2010, 04:04:43 PM »
This site is so amusing there's even an Astronomy Thread!

I wanted to be an Astronaut when I was a kid and I also love science so it's cool that there's a thread like this in this site, talk about variety :sleep:. I always find it relaxing looking at the heavenly bodies and different kind of constellations it automatically clears my mind and give me strength to keep moving forward.

Knowing that there's so many galaxies aside from our own Milky Way Galaxy, and that our Universe is still expanding, there are nebulas, not to mention blackholes, antimatter and dark matter. That our Sun is a gigantic star and of course our beloved mother, our planet Earth.

It's really incredible. All of this gives me a reason to 'Believe'.

My friend mentions this to me and I was astonished when I saw this.

Whirlpool Galaxy (M51). Credits www.hubblesite.org

It's like a cross in the middle ofthe galaxy.


Offline daigong

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #27 on: April 14, 2010, 12:13:28 AM »
Thanks Alyssa Milano tweet, pretty deep shit from Carl  Sagan:



Appreciate life every day! MAKE THE MOST OF IT!!!

Offline Amplifier

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #28 on: May 07, 2010, 03:44:43 PM »
Quote
A colossal star many times the mass of our own Sun is seen growing in a bubble of excited gas just pictured by the Herschel space observatory.

The image of the bubble, known as RCW 120, has been released a few days ahead of the European telescope's first birthday in orbit.

Herschel's infrared detectors are tuned to see the cold materials that give birth to stars.

Pictures like RCW 120 will help explain how really giant ones are made.
...
The "baby" star is perhaps a few tens of thousands of years old and has yet to ignite the nuclear furnace that will form at its core. But it is some eight to 10 times the mass of our Sun and is surrounded by about 200 times as much material.
BBC News - Herschel space telescope pierces giant star bubble

Offline Stryfe

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #29 on: May 25, 2010, 02:17:38 PM »


 :bow:

Offline twissie

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #30 on: July 04, 2010, 11:54:41 PM »
The Ghost Snake of the Milky Way


From http://www.dailygalaxy.com/ :

"A cosmic snake appears to slither across the plane of our Milky Way galaxy in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The snake-like object  located about 11,000 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius is actually the core of a thick, sooty cloud large enough to swallow dozens of solar systems and may be harboring beastly stars in the process of forming.

"The snake is an ideal place to hunt for massive forming stars as they have not had time to heat up and destroy the cloud they are born in," said Dr. Sean Carey, of NASA's Spitzer Science Center.

Spitzer was able to spot the sinuous cloud using its heat-seeking infrared vision. The object is hiding in the dusty plane of our Milky Way galaxy, invisible to optical telescopes. Because its heat, or infrared light, can sneak through the dust, it first showed up in infrared images from past missions. The cloud is so thick with dust that if you were to somehow transport yourself into the middle of it, you would see nothing but black, not even a star in the sky.

Spitzer's new view of the snake provides the best view of what lurks inside. The yellow and orange spots located on and around it are massive stars just beginning to take shape. The bright red spot located on its belly is a monstrous stellar embryo, with about 20 to 50 times the mass of our sun.

Astronomers say these observations will ultimately help them better understand how massive stars form. By studying the clustering and range of masses of the stellar embryos, they hope to determine if the stars were born in the same way that our low-mass sun was formed -- out of a collapsing cloud of gas and dust -- or by another mechanism in which the environment plays a larger role. " - link

This thing seriously looks like the crack from the recent series of Doctor Who @_@; That thing also made the stars disappear.............

Offline Amplifier

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #31 on: July 05, 2010, 12:15:35 AM »
^My face when I saw that:  :O2 -> :shocked: -> :panic:

Offline 1517

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #32 on: July 07, 2010, 11:36:12 AM »
^
^
.. cool snake shape.  :D

Just found this link: http://www.hellofromearth.net/
maybe need for better space telescope to make sure Gliese 581d is support life.  :?

Offline Amplifier

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #33 on: July 26, 2010, 11:09:03 PM »
Hold on to your butts

Quote
Cosmic explosions thousands of light-years away could shut down photosynthesis in the ocean at depths of up to 260 feet, a new study suggests. The calculations add to a growing body of research linking these great blasts, called gamma-ray bursts, with biological damage and even mass extinctions on Earth.

Source: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2010/07/grb-photosynthesis-shutdown/



Phil Plait, creator of Bad Astronomy is getting a three-part TV show on The Discovery Channel.

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2010/07/23/my-sooper-sekrit-project-revealed/

Offline twissie

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #34 on: October 01, 2010, 02:04:37 PM »
Gliese 581g :panic:

Alien life certain to exist on Earth-like planet, scientists say
The chances of alien life existing on a newly-discovered Earth-like planet are 100 per cent, an astronomer has claimed.
 
Gliese 581g was discovered orbiting a nearby star at a distance that places it squarely in the "habitable zone" where liquid could exist on its surface. Of around 500 planets that astronomers have found outside Earth's solar system, this is the first to be considered habitable.
The planet is a similar size to Earth and its mass indicates that it is probably rocky with a definite surface and has enough gravity to hold an atmosphere, according to Prof Steven Vogt, who led the team that discovered it.
 
It is as yet unknown whether water does exist on the planet or what kind of atmosphere it has. But because conditions are ideal for liquid, which is always a precursor for life on Earth, Prof Vogt believes that life will undoubtedly have begun there.
"Personally, given the ubiquity and propensity of life to flourish wherever it can, I would say, my own personal feeling is that the chances of life on this planet are 100 percent," he said during a press briefing. "I have almost no doubt about it."
The findings are based on 11 years of observations by ground-based telescopes at the W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii.
The close proximity of Gliese 581g and the fact that it was found relatively early in the astronomers' search suggests that there may be billions of other habitable planets like Earth in the universe.

Prof Vogt estimates that as many as one in five to 10 stars in the universe have planets that are Earth-sized and in the habitable zone.
With an estimated 200 billion stars in the galaxy, that means that around 40 billion planets could have the potential for life, he said.
The new findings by Prof Vogt and Paul Butler, of the Carnegie Institution in Washington, will be published in the Astrophysical Journal.
The paper reports the discovery of two new planets around the nearby red dwarf star Gliese 581.
The most interesting of the two new planets is Gliese 581g, which has a mass three to four times that of Earth and an orbital period of just under 37 days.
Gliese 581g is located 20 light years away from Earth in the constellation Libra.
The planet is tidally locked to the star, meaning that one side is always facing the star and basking in perpetual daylight, while the side facing away from the star is in perpetual darkness.

The researchers estimate that the average surface temperature of the planet is between -24 and 10 degrees Fahrenheit (-31 to -12 degrees Celsius).
Actual temperatures would range from blazing hot on the side facing the star to freezing cold on the dark side.
The surface gravity would be about the same or slightly higher than Earth's, so that a person could easily walk upright on the planet, Prof Vogt said.

Offline the3rd

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #35 on: January 26, 2011, 12:24:29 AM »
i posted this image in another thread but thought it should go here as well
"Don’t kid yourself, Jimmy. If a cow ever got the chance, he’d eat you and everyone you care about!" ----Troy McClure

Offline daigong

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #36 on: August 06, 2012, 06:46:16 AM »
Let's watch! http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/nasatv/


holy shit dope. huge proram to land shit http://eyes.nasa.gov/

Offline daigong

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #37 on: August 06, 2012, 07:41:51 AM »
THEY LANDED MARS BITCHES!!!

Scientists go wild so more awkward bro hugs in one place than an H!O meet up XD




they got thumnails and my stream froze so...mmmscience girls

Offline daigong

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Re: The Astronomy Thread
« Reply #38 on: August 12, 2012, 04:43:53 AM »
JFC got his telescopes out for the Perseid meteor shower hits its peak tonite!



The show happens every year as the Earth passes through the dust cloud left by a comet.

“The comet isn’t anywhere near us right now, but its dust is still trailing behind it,” said Alan Dyer, astronomer at Calgary’s Telus Spark Centre.

“And we pass through this dust stream. And what you see are brief streaks of light burning up in the atmosphere after they enter the atmosphere at very high speeds.”

NASA says the best times to see the shower are just before dawn on August 11 and 12, although they should be visible as early as 10:00 p.m.

just after dawn, been a while skies are actually clear! Gotta wake up early for bball and ABCHO anyways!


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