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Author Topic: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread  (Read 37583 times)

Offline daigong

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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #40 on: February 26, 2011, 08:30:24 PM »
Watched All About Ah Long 阿郎的故事 (1989)  recently



Big time HK Film nominee for 9 Hong Kong Film Awards, best movie, actor (Chow Yun-fat) etc. but only Best Actress (Sylvia Chang) won.

Really touching movie, between father and son when suddenly he is reunited with his ex-lover who happened to be recruiting his son for a commercial AND happens to be the kid's mom.

He loves her, and she does too so passionately that she nearly rips his lips off.



Chow at his finest mouthful lower class kinda guy


working at the quarry with hilarious hair


Funny scene in the restaurant where only english is spoken, Chow's like "I'll have what he's having"


and ends up with the kids meal


lol out of nowhere there's this motorcycle racing scene




Still, some epic acting performances - the kid I think was in THE STORY OF MY SON 爱的世界 too

Offline daigong

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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #41 on: March 28, 2011, 08:10:28 AM »
^ and here chow yun fat winning best actor for Ah Long.


and winning singing awards! lol no just presenting/performing



but pulling off crazy stunts on TV anniversary specials!


lol i thought he was gonna jump over the fence

and Koreans love him too!

Offline tehdc

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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #42 on: April 01, 2011, 07:53:23 AM »



lol @ fock you!
i miss the badass chow yun fat. i'm not feeling the martial arts stuff hes doing. and hollywood has made him look so bad/give him crappy roles...

Offline zeroyui

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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #43 on: April 05, 2011, 12:15:01 PM »
He was godly in Hardboiled. I even played the game that he was on in the ps3 game. Such a good actor, i only hope that he coulda made more movies>.>

Offline Tao Priest

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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #44 on: April 13, 2011, 10:09:27 PM »


My favorite comedy part with him. Absolutely hilarious!

Offline nimrod

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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #45 on: May 19, 2011, 02:28:53 AM »
Happy Birthday Fat Gor!

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Offline daigong

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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #46 on: May 24, 2011, 10:39:59 AM »
Watched Love Unto Waste from 1986, which Chow got a best supportin actor nom, which Tony Leung Chiu-wai gets caught up in a love triangle, or square and there's a murder! And Chow is the weird cop on the case, "Hey, you wanna do exercises?" which Tony goes "Officer, I been here since 11, what do you want from me?"




he goes and "hangs out" with them at his rice shop:


Funniest part was when Chow was like "You know what I feel like doing up here?"


And all Tony can do is "Have you had enough now?" lol. Then they all go get drunk:




Turns out he had cancer, and just wanted some friends to hang with...or just hang with people whose life sucked more than his. "Am I an asshole?"


Damn, powerful powerful stuff.
 


Offline daigong

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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #47 on: June 11, 2011, 11:11:47 AM »
his newest movie. A Communist's Pride!!!

Chow Yun Fat is asked to play a different Yuan Shikai



With almost 200 actors from three lands on both sides of the strait, BEGINNING OF THE GREAT REVIVAL yesterday held a premiere press conference and ceremony in Beijing. Directors Han Sanping and Huang Jianxin led actors Chow Yun Fat, Zhao Benshan, Liu Ye, Feng Yuanzheng, Li Qin, Dong Jie, Li Chen, He Ping, Zhou Jie, Nie Yuan, Fan Bingbing, Ye Xuan, Liu Tao and others in an appearance.

Han Sanping and Huang Jianxin even talked about the actors' performances in the film. Han Sanping said, "This time we invited 178 actors. Despite most appeared in special performances or cameos, some even had to take time off from their original productions, now the film is finally completed after a year. I hope to thank all actors through today." Huang Jianxin even "exposed" Fat Gor, "Before this press conference something very surprising to me happened. Before we communicated with the actors the situation of attending the press conference, Chow Yun Fat took the initiative to ask us about it. Something so minor touched all of us particular. With their great support, I believe BEGINNING OF THE GREAT REVIVAL will definitely become a new milestone for national films."

As for Chow Yun Fat and Zhao Benshan the two "Beiyang Warlords" made their first appearance. When Chow Yun Fat received the role of Yuan Shikai, Huang Jianxin asked him specifically to "have to perform a different feel". Fat Gor said, "At the time Director Huang Jianxin chatted with me specifically, saying that I must not bring shades of Huang Silang (his LET THE BULLETS FLY character) to Yuan Shikai. In addition I couldn't play Yuan Shikai as an absolute villain. Thus we studied for a long time about this character. For all of my scenes, Director Han would watch on the set. So I could sense how important this character was to him."

However, Fat Gor did not forget to "complain". "In order to play this character, before the shoot I didn't eat everyday. I relied on water to replenish my energy." He revealed, "I feel this time Director Han had a grudge with me, all the subordinates he arranged for me had problems. Zhao Benshan, Feng Gong, Fan Wei were joking around on the set everyday, no wonder when I was the President the country would be such a mess!" Fat Gor also joked, "In the film I had eight wives, in the end I didn't even see one." Fat Gor's "complaints" left Han Sanping scrambling to explain, "Actually you had 'scenes' with them, but in that scene your Yuan Shikai passed away so you didn't see them."

Playing Duan Qirui, Zhao Benshan said, "This time I had many scenes with Fat Gor, from him I could sense his serious confidence on this character. Our collaboration was very pleasant. On the set we also often made fun of him." Playing Mao Zedong, Liu Ye expressed deep regret about unable to work with Fat Gor. "Fat Gor and I have worked together before, but I always had the feeling of not having enough. So this time I very much regretted not having any scene with Fat Gor."

As for the box office, Han Sanping confidently said, "BEGINNING OF THE GREAT REVIVAL is better than FOUNDING OF A REPUBLIC." Huang Jianxin said, "I believe BEGINNING OF THE GREAT REVIVAL's box office will definitely excessive FOUNDING OF A REPUBLIC's." After the shoot wrap, two directors went their separate ways. This press conference was the two directors' first meeting in half a year. Han Sanping also said, "Currently the U.S., Canada, Australia, and several dozen nations overseas rights have been signed. The film's international version was already completed. Actually recently we have been very happy and thanked all of BEGINNING OF THE GREAT REVIVAL hard working people."

Source: singtao, takungpao
Translated by: hktopten



Offline daigong

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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #48 on: June 21, 2011, 07:01:27 AM »
Chow Yun-fat classic song XD


OH VELLY NICE!

eta:

pimping his new movie with Myolie!

Chow Yun Fat protects Myolie Wu's 1 second screen time in his film




The film Beginning of the Great Revival (建黨偉業) held a charitable premiere last night. The attendees include Chow Yun Fat and his wife, Liu Ye, Nick Cheung, Angelababy, Michelle Ye and Myolie Wu. Myolie makes a 1 second camero in the film as Chow Yun Fat's 7th mistress. She was much luckier than Tang Wei, who had her scenes completely cut out. It turns out Myolie had Chow Yun Fat's protection that saved her the 1 second screen time.

Fat Gor became the main focus when he appeared at the event, Liu Ye said that with Fat Gor around, it is a stress reliever? Fat Gor said: "Liu Ye is the lead actor, I am just a supporting actor!" Fat Gor plays Yuan Shikai, Liu Ye wanted to exchange roles with him, but Fat Gor was not willing to because he expressed he can't play Mao Zedong. Andy Lau plays Cai E and has scenes with Fat Gor, it has been many years since they last collaborated. He praises that Andy is very handsome and looks younger than before, but he's too thin.

Secret 'nude photos' by paparazzi is very terrifying

When asked about his opinion on the recent 'nude photo' incident taken by the media? Fat Gor said it's too over, and laughed that the media can take the photos, but don't publish them. He's also worried that if he got secretly photographed, that would be very terrifying for him, but at his house when he changes, he has frosted glass in the bathroom and he won't go out in the balcony.

Sexy outfits, not necessary for Bosco Wong to look over

Last night, Myolie was dressed in a sexy outfit and stole the limelight. She laughed and said that she rarely has a chance to dress up, so this time she deliberately dressed up for this occassion. Usually at home, she just dresses very causally. Asked if she need to first have Bosco Wong look over her outfit? She said not necessary. In the film, Myolie plays the 7th mistress of Yuan Shikai, who has a 1 second camero appearance, and it was fortunate that she did not get cut. Myolie said she was at the same scene as Fat Gor, but no scenes opposite of him. He is an international actor, while she turned into an Extra ('ke lei fe'), it is a special experience. Fat Gor takes good care of TVB artists, and treats her very well. During the shoot, he especially told the director not to cut her scene out! It was said she was more awesome than Tang Wei because her scenes were cut out completely.

Source: Mingpao
Translator: aZnangel@AEU
« Last Edit: June 21, 2011, 07:11:13 AM by daigong »

Offline Deaglezero

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Re: The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #49 on: June 25, 2011, 03:44:04 AM »

NO ONE fired double pistols like Chow, nor looks as suave doing so...

I totally agree. Somehow the gangster themes of those John Woo movies and blazing gunfights just captured the whole 80s HK police/gangster movie feeling, and Chow's other roles in "God of Gamblers" etc. were beyond awesome as well.

I have a lot of respect for what Chow Yun-Fat did back in the days of HK cinema, because he was a very versatile actor.

I mean, look at Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Chow fitted the role of a swordsman so perfectly even though he can look just as good firing dual pistols as a hitman/cop or whatever.

Offline Frenchy

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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #50 on: June 29, 2011, 12:42:54 AM »
I always liked his versatility - you could go into any Chow Yun-Fat film knowing that he would be great no matter what the genre was.
His action films were solid, comedy was funny, romance was believable, and so on.
I once read an article where a reporter compared him to Cary Grant and I think that is a close comparison.

Offline nimrod

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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #51 on: July 18, 2011, 04:55:29 PM »
Stephen Chow Has Started Working On A NEW CHINESE ODYSSEY

Long before Stephen Chow came to fame in the West with SHAOLIN SOCCER and KUNG FU HUSTLE, he was already a superstar in Asia for many years and starred in many classic films. His 1994 films A CHINESE ODYSSEY PART ONE: PANDORA'S BOX and PART TWO: CINDERELLA were two of his early classics. Loosely based on the famous Chinese novel A Journey to the West, the films tell the story of the Monkey King travelling with his friends to the west to acquire sutras from India.

Now news has come that Chow has already started shooting A NEW CHINESE ODYSSEY. He is co-directing the film with Kwok Chi-kin (GALLANTS' director), while also acting as the film's producer and screenwriter.

According to reports, Chow was originally planning to play a master monk, but now is likely going to reprise his role as the Monkey King (on the request of the film's investors). Anthony Wong will be playing the role of the master monk instead, while Taiwanese pop star Show Luo will be playing Pigsy. The gorgeous Shu Qi will be starring as the film's heroine.

I think this news is most interesting not only because Stephen Chow is now making a new film and reprising an old role, but of the fact that Donnie Yen is also playing the Monkey King in his upcoming new film (titled THE MONKEY KING).

 http://twitchfilm.com/news/2011/07/stephen-chow-has-started-working-on-a-new-chinese-odyssey.php

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Offline daigong

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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #52 on: December 03, 2011, 10:54:19 AM »

Offline daigong

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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #53 on: March 11, 2012, 08:47:09 AM »
classic pix! Big Award Winner!



Wong Jing revealed that Huang Xiaoming has joined the cast of "Once Upon a Time in Shanghai" with Chow Yun-Fat and Sammo Hung. Both Chow and Huang have played the lead character, Hui Man Keung, in TV series versions of the story. Yuan Quan (Yolanda Yuan) and Yuan Li were also named as joining the cast. A Lunar New Year release is planned.



via http://ent.sina.com.cn/m/c/2012-03-06/10183573328.shtml


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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #54 on: March 16, 2012, 07:59:47 AM »
BLOWN AWAY!! nice insight on his favorite movies:

Quote
Chow Yun-fat
Posted: 14 Mar 2012



Is there a more fitting person to unveil our 100 Greatest Hong Kong Films special feature than Chow Yun-fat? We think not. The ever personable superstar shares his views on our movie list – and the current state of Hong Kong cinema. Interview by Edmund Lee.

It’s one of life’s beautiful ironies that Chow Yun-fat – the Lamma native who reached the zenith of Chinese-language filmmaking with such timeless classics as A Better Tomorrow (1986), An Autumn’s Tale (1987) and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) – would become a superstar by not acting anything like one. In person, the 56-year-old actor assumes the air of a friendly everyman who just so happens to be Hong Kong cinema’s biggest name; in public, he has shunned the limelight and restricted his public appearances to a controlled minimum; but when he does show up, you’ll be forgiven for thinking it’s the emperor who has entered the room.

For instance, at his last movie premiere in Hong Kong (for the star-studded Chinese epic Beginning of the Great Revival), the press room had noticeably gone a notch quieter when Chow – and not any of the other big-name actors – arrived. Speaking exclusively to Time Out on March 2, Chow is still bemused when I tell him the air seemed to have temporarily stood still on that royal entrance. “I feel that [the journalists] were behaving that way because I seldom attend those functions,” he says with modesty. “I’m actually not the type of person [who puts on an air of superiority], you know what I mean? It’s just that if I tried to act like we’re the best of friends then… it might be a bit scary for you.” He’s giggling now. “On other occasions, like when people ask me for a photo on the street, I’ll just hold the iPhone and take it with them.”

It’s in the same jovial spirit that I chat with Chow about our special feature, his illustrious career and where Hong Kong cinema is heading...

In our list of the 100 Greatest Hong Kong Films, you star in seven of them –
 Tell me about them!

Make a guess.
 You want me to guess? Um, God of Gamblers (1989), An Autumn’s Tale (1987), City on Fire (1987), A Better Tomorrow (1986), The Killer (1989)… what are the last two?

Hard Boiled (1992) and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000).
 Oh yes, yes. Hard Boiled is the one by… John Woo – that’s right. So Prison on Fire (1987) is not included? [Laughs]

The problem is you’ve made too many good films! Which of the movies mentioned do you think will rank the highest?
 It’s probably A Better Tomorrow.

Indeed, most of the local industry people I talked to mentioned it, while the likes of Hard Boiled and The Killer seem to be enjoying greater acclaims overseas. Do you have a theory on this?
 If we consider the characterisation, the explosiveness and the entertainment value, then of course Mark Gor [in A Better Tomorrow] is great fun. The character struck a chord with the local viewers because it is very identifiable to them: Mark Gor is both faithful and honourable. As for my favourite – or what I consider to be the best – from the several John Woo movies, I’d pick The Killer. It’s cool and stylish, and it resembles foreign movies in its composition. It’s unique in that it’s transcended the limits of Hong Kong films, having a little bit of the flavours of French films and Hollywood films.

It has a romanticised ambience.
 Exactly, exactly. A Better Tomorrow is much more ‘hard-selling’ and straightforward [by comparison]. As for Hard Boiled, perhaps the foreign audience likes the Hong Kong style exemplified by its bird-cage-breaking opening shootout at a [traditional Chinese] teahouse; they like to watch something that is culturally flavoured. Maybe that’s why.

When you look back at those movies, are you surprised that so many of them have stood the test of time and become classics?
 I haven’t really thought about it, not really.

But did you feel like you were doing something special back then?
 Not really. From my perspective as an actor, I tried to give my best performance to achieve what’s required of each of my roles – and to make the film better. That’s the basics to making a living in the world: you have to provide a service of [certain quality] – right? I wouldn’t consider whether a film may turn into a classic someday; that’s not what I pay attention to. I won’t pay attention to the awards, either. Maybe because I’m from the older generation of actors, [chuckles] I think I should help the boss make a profit. If a boss can make a living, he’ll be able to continue hiring me. [Laughs]

Good thinking.
 That’s why I give my 200 percent to play the characters and this is still my attitude up to these days. At the end it’s a business; we’re not making art films, and your salary isn’t cheap. It’s not about your personal interest – unless you’re taking less to work on a project you like. For example, I gave a discount to take part in The Postmodern Life of My Aunt (2006), because I like the character, I like [director] Ann Hui and I like the film on the whole. That was fun. You can try to do something different in it, but that’s not a commercial film – it’s an arthouse film. Another example: you see Andy Lau is investing in [Hui’s latest film] A Simple Life? That’s very risky too. [Chuckles] Isn’t it?

Have you seen the film yet?
 I haven’t, but I will.

It’s quite a good film actually.
 Yeah? I [always] watch Ann’s films.

I’d like to ask you something about your formative years. What are the earliest movies that you remember seeing?
 When I was living on Lamma Island as a kid, I was mostly watching Cantonese opera. [Laughs] I mean the bamboo theatre for the Tin Hau Festival… when you didn’t have electric lamps and were only using oil lamps in the tents… when you see things light up in that darkness… it’s like being in a dream. And you know how detached the music and lyrics of Cantonese opera could make you feel, how their costumes and makeup [could make you feel]… so I felt ‘wow, that was really amazing!’ [Chuckles] When you were used to the very dark environment and suddenly came across something like that, it was really memorable.

So when was your first ‘experience’ with cinema?
 After I moved out from Lamma and began living on Portland Street, I often secretly went to the late afternoon screenings. They were really cheap – about 20 cents [for a ticket]. The cinemas at the time also offered [discounted] tickets to movies that had been shown for over a month. My favourite was definitely 633 Squadron (1964). The previously released movies we watched then were all Hollywood blockbusters; we didn’t have money to watch on the first run. I watched a lot of vampire movies, and I watched The Great Escape (1963), The Longest Day (1962), Gone with the Wind (1939) and a lot of very impressive Hollywood movies. I didn’t know how to [properly] appreciate them when I was young, but when I saw those major Hollywood productions it was still a pretty amazing experience.

And did you ever dream of being up on the silver screen yourself?
 No! [Laughs] I was merely looking at the colourful world as a country bumpkin. Watching those movies was like living in dreams.

Was there any Hong Kong movie star from that period who left a deep impression on you?
 Before we moved out [from Lamma], we didn’t have many chances to see the [Hong Kong] black-and-white movies, and they wouldn’t bring those films to screen on Lamma. So I missed that period [of Hong Kong cinema]. I would occasionally catch up after black-and-white television broadcasts began, but… the most popular [movie star] then was Connie Chan. “Here comes Connie Chan!” [Laughs] And I very seldom watched those Yam-Pak [Cantonese opera] films. It’s in the 1970s, when I was enrolled in the [TVB] actor-trainee programme, that I started to catch up with the movies.

The representative directors today, such as John Woo, Tsui Hark and Johnnie To, were deeply influenced by the 1960s and 70s films by the likes of King Hu and Chang Cheh. Did you watch those early films?
 Yes, yes, yes. You know, Shaw Brothers Studio was associated with the trainee programme. We didn’t have our lessons in Shaw Brothers but we did go and watch their movies. I really liked to watch [director] Chor Yuen’s Killer Clans (1976) and Chang Cheh’s Blood Brothers (1973). We were working as extras then, so we had time to go out [and watch movies]. But since the early 1980s, when I began to have the chances to play leading roles, there’d been more than a dozen years in which I didn’t see any movies. [Laughs] I was working day and night and had absolutely no time to watch movies. Even in the heyday of Hong Kong cinema in the 80s, the only chance I got to watch movies were the occasional midnight screenings that the bosses asked me to go to – otherwise I’d be working. [Laughs]

That sounds crazy.
 When my television series were at their most popular I also had no chance to watch them, because we would still be filming when [the
 earlier episodes] were broadcast. I just heard about [my works] from other people, you know what I mean? It took a long time to shoot then –
 for both TV and film. Dude, when we shot Hard Boiled we worked on well over 100 sets. [Laughs] It was a major production!

This reminds me of [cinematographer] Christopher Doyle’s reply when I asked him to name his favourite Hong Kong films a few days ago. He said he couldn’t name any because he ‘makes films to make films, not to watch films’.
 That’s very true.

I guess this is a very common statement for people working in the industry.
 It is, it is. And when you happen to have made something that’s turned out to be surprisingly successful, all you can say is ‘oh’. It’s just one word: ‘oh.’ [Laughs] You have no idea how people in the public are seeing you; you just keep your head down and work like there’s no tomorrow.

Many Hong Kong audiences feel that the best time – the ‘Golden Age’, so to speak – is already in the past. Do you agree with that?
 I totally agree. Because the production costs were lower in the past, and the salaries are relatively expensive nowadays. In a city in which property costs are so high… now, you can go back a little bit and look at the death of Japanese cinema, which was entirely down to the high property costs. Studios such as Toei Company have all utilised their lands in the property market and not troubled themselves to make movies, no? [Laughs] You know how much we used to like Japanese movies? That has all changed since their economy took flight in the 1980s. Even an iconic figure like Akira Kurosawa had to rely on Steven Spielberg’s funding [to make the film Dreams (1990)]; and he’s a national treasure, wasn’t he? So now, unless the four major property developers [in Hong Kong] decide to support our cinema… [Laughs]. It’s very expensive now – from the actors to everything else. Our population also only has seven million people, so our box office… what can we do about it?

We’d just build more houses.
 That’s the thing! What can we do? We can of course make more films like Gallants [2010, the low-budget best picture winner at the 2011 Hong Kong Film Awards]. But can we gather 100 industry people to unite and give low-budget movies a chance together?

How about the trend of Hong Kong-Mainland co-productions in recent years? Do you think it’s a good thing for our industry?
 It’s not up to us. Things change along with the times; there will always be a culture of sorts in any given period of time [in history]. For example, if they had torn down the Sunbeam Theatre, would there still be Cantonese opera? There would still be some. [Laughs] You’d see them at Ko Shan Theatre or Tsuen Wan – the smaller venues. You can’t stop the change of times. It’s very difficult. And you can also see that there’s a shortage of actors today. Many would think: if it takes so much time [to become an actor], why don’t I be a singer instead? How long would it take to turn someone into a movie star? It’s very difficult now.

Being a Cantopop singer has become one of the most natural paths to becoming a movie actor nowadays…
 Indeed, indeed.

They don’t start out as actors any more.
 They don’t, because it’s a tough road. It’s like ‘I’d rather enrol in the Miss Hong Kong pageant than the actor-trainee programme’. [Laughs] It’s too difficult to get ahead.

Now that you’re one of the biggest movie stars in Chinese language cinema…
 I’m just an actor! I’m not a star.

Okay, but seriously, have you been taken aback by your achievement?
 Not really. I just treat it as a job. It’s pointless even if people put a crown on my head. [Laughs] I mean, I have my own way of life, and I’m still taking the MTR and buses. My life wouldn’t change if you give me a boat or an airplane. That I have an interest in something doesn’t mean that I have to milk it for all it’s worth; the fun I have when I work on a set with all the [cast and crew] is greater than what comes to me afterwards.

Throughout your film career, what question have you been asked the most?
 ‘How did I create a certain character?’ But it’s impossible to explain [to those who’re asking], because as long as they haven’t spent the long hours on the set with me, they won’t understand what filmmaking is all about. For example: you’re interviewing me now, and I’m also full of questions about how you’re going to write this up afterwards. After you’ve listened to and digested [what I said], you’d come up with something – written words, specifically – that are slightly altered according to your own emotions and knowledge. When I read your interview another day and think back to our conversation today, I’d also have a [new understanding]. Same for filmmaking: we hear the story from the film director and we perform on the scene after discussing it, but you can’t simply envision the end results. If I showed you the script of A Better Tomorrow, you wouldn’t have guessed how it’d turn out to be like; and when I read your story later on, I’d also think: “Oh, Edmund, you’re writing it like this?” [Laughs] You know what I mean?

Yes, I think so.
 You have your room for creativity, just as I have my room for creativity. The process is where we meet and interact.

Do you have a habit of re-watching your own movies?
 That very rarely happens. I watched the [pre-release] midnight screening [and that’s it]. I have a habit: I don’t watch the playback on the set, and this has been the case ever since my television days. I only watched my films once when I got the chance to see them on the big screen. Why do I do that? Because it should be the director who tells me what to do, and it’s not about what I think I should do after watching the playback.

So if you could show your family just one of your films, which would you choose?
 I think An Autumn’s Tale is good. [Laughs] I really like how it provides the fantasy that there may be a table for two [for the protagonists] at the
 end. There’s a bit of hope. It’s also precious for two people from different cultural backgrounds to come together eventually. I like watching dramas a lot; for action films I like watching the Die Hard movies, the Rambo movies and the Indiana Jones movies, but I like watching dramas more than action films.

But you’re most famous for your action films!
 But then, from start to finish, I’ve always been trained to be an actor since my actor-trainee programme! People just pushed me into being an action star! [Laughs] Dude, it’s such an irony. I never learned to fight or anything, you know what I mean? I’ve never been a martial arts actor.

Is that why you chose to add a little extra depth into your action roles? I saw that you’re often chewing on a toothpick...
 It’s only Mark Gor [in A Better Tomorrow].

Not only him but…
 I think there’s only Mark Gor – who else?

You’re doing that in Hard Boiled too.
 So… it’s only the John Woo series. [Laughs]

Finally, can you tell Time Out your top five favourite Hong Kong films?
 I like Tsui Hark’s Once Upon a Time in China (1991) – I like it very much. And I like Tsui’s Shanghai Blues (1984) and The Butterfly Murders (1979), Ann Hui’s The Spooky Bunch (1980) and Boat People (1982), Yim Ho’s Homecoming (1984), and I like Stephen Chow’s movies. [Laughs] They are hilarious. Actually, I love watching comedies the most.

Really? You should do more of them.
 I think comedies are enjoyable to both the audience and me. It’s a lot of fun on the set: even if you can resist laughing, the crew members on the side are already laughing [during the filming]. Comedies are hard to do, but if you can do it, it’s a lot of fun.

Is there any type of character that you still really want to portray on film?
 Yes, there are many. For actors, our roles change as our age increases. There’s no turning back at some point. There must be characters that you’ll find the chance to play at different ages. Like Jane Fonda’s father [Henry Fonda] and his film On Golden Pond [1981]: you will have the chance to play that kind of [elderly] character one day; that’s just the way it is. From your acting skills to your life experience to your body, it’s all heading in that direction. You’ll see me do that not very long from now. [Laughs]

Lastly, how do you want to be remembered decades from now?
 It’s good enough if the audiences like the movies and like the characters. I’m only a performer. As long as they enjoy watching me, I’ve done my job and that’s fine with me already. The main issue is: as a performer who’s collecting a pay cheque, I’m satisfied as long as the box office is decent and the boss isn’t losing money. If the audiences like [my performance], of course I’m happy; but even if they don’t, there’s not much I can do for them either – dude, I’m just making a living! [Laughs]

via http://www.timeout.com.hk/film/features/49196/chow-yun-fat.html


The list is instant fail with Hard Boiled at 99.
http://timeout.com.hk/film/features/47714/the-100-greatest-hong-kong-films.html

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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #55 on: June 17, 2012, 07:32:35 AM »
pimping "The Last Tycoon 大上海" with  Huang Xiaoming and crew at  15th Shanghai International Film Festival (SIFF)





sneak peek presser the other day



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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #56 on: July 15, 2012, 09:24:36 AM »
Chow Yun-fat to End the Year with 'The Last Tycoon'     
2012-07-10 13:39:19     CRIENGLISH.com       Web Editor: Xie Tingting

 Chow Yun-fat says he is looking forward to ending the year in style with his new film releasing in December.


Actors (from left to right) Huang Xiaoming, Francis Ng and Chow Yun-fat on the set of the film "The Last Tycoon" [Photo: mtime.com]

Actor Chow Yun-fat says he is looking forward to ending the year in style with his film "The Last Tycoon" releasing in December.



Chow told media recently while celebrating the conclusion of filming, "This year-end is going to be a wonderful movie-going season." The season will host Jackie Chan's "CZ12", Stephen Chow's "New Chinese Odyssey", and Wong Kar-wai's "The Grandmasters".

Chow explained, "because of them, in addition to my film, the box-office derby will be very exciting."

"The Last Tycoon", directed by Wong Jing and produced by Andrew Lau, is inspired by the real-life story of a gang leader who built his empire through the 1920s and 30s in Shanghai.

Chow Yun-fat plays the lead character, alongside Sammo Hung, Francis Ng, Huang Xiaoming and Yuan Quan.

A selling point for the film has largely been the cooperation between Chow Yun-fat and Huang Xiaoming. Chow made his name in 1980 for his role in the hit TV series "The Bund", and Huang took over the role in a 2007 remake.



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Chow Yun-Fat first Asian brand ambassador for Hugo Boss
« Reply #57 on: July 18, 2012, 09:28:49 AM »
LIKE A BOSS!!



Actor Chow Yun Fat has been tapped to be the first Asian brand ambassador for Hugo Boss.

The 57-year-old, who has modeled for Boss in the past, is now officially the ambassador for its high-end menswear brand, Boss Selection.


via http://news.asiaone.com/News/Latest%2BNews/Showbiz/Story/A1Story20120717-359552.html

no brainer. Fat Goh is THE ULTIMATE COOL in Asian Entertainment, everyone else just imitating. doing the catwalk lol reporter fangirling in 3D, dem juices flowing!



“We are most honored to have Chow Yun-Fat as the first Asian testimonial in the history of Hugo Boss. He possesses not only immaculate style and class, but also the confidence and charisma of a man of distinction. He is the true embodiment of the spirit of the brand,” remarked Gerrit Ruetzel, president and CEO of Hugo Boss Asia-Pacific.


more pix from: http://www.brandingmagazine.com/2012/07/11/chow-yun-fat-as-hugo-boss-brand-ambassador/





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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #58 on: August 12, 2012, 06:22:21 PM »
New Stills of 'The Assassins' Released     
2012-08-09 15:29:19     Chinesefilms.cn       Web Editor: Xie Tingting




 Chow Yun-fat plays Cao Cao in the costume drama film "The Assassins".

A conceptual poster and a batch of stills for the costume drama film "The Assassins" have been released.

"The Assassins" features a strong line-up, including Chow Yun-fat, Liu Yifei, Hiroshi Tamaki, Alec Su, Annie Shizuka Inoh, Qiu Xinzhi, Yao Lu and Ni Dahong.

Chow plays Cao Cao, an important figure in the Three Kingdoms period.

Cao once built the famous Bronze Sparrow Terrace where musicians and dancers would perform to entertain guests at his banquets.

Based on the historical evidence, the film emphasizes the characteristics of people at that time.

Directed by Zhao Linshan, "The Assassins" is scheduled for release in October.

By Liu Shuai

ETA:

TRAILER!!
« Last Edit: August 12, 2012, 07:11:13 PM by daigong »

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Re: [CHI] The Official Chow Yun-Fat Thread
« Reply #59 on: August 14, 2012, 08:48:31 AM »

FAt Gor!! hamming it up with Liu Yifei at the "The Assassins" showcase:






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